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Dog Spots: How to fix & prevent?

Fix and prevent dog spots in your lawn

Why do Dog Spots show up on my lawn?

The yellow spots that develop after your dog urinates on your lawn are caused by the high concentration of nitrogen-containing compounds and associated salts that are naturally present in dog urine. Lawns that are overly dry or already weak and stressed are especially susceptible to dog urine damage. Whenever dog spots appear, water the area deeply and repeatedly to flush the urine salts out of the surrounding soil.

How to Repair?

Minor damage may fill in with surrounding grass over time, but you don't have to wait on nature. Even though you can't bring dead grass back to life, you can repair dog spots, so they look as good as new. First, remove the dead grass from the area, and then repair the spot with soil & seed specialty products that are designed for dog spots. These all-in-one remedies for dog lawn spots combine drought-tolerant, water-conserving, premium grass seeds, fertilizer and natural wood mulch to grow beautiful, healthy grass where dog spots were.

Whenever you do lawn repairs, remember to keep your pet away from any area with new grass seed. You don't need to worry about your dog, but you do need to protect your future grass. New grass seed needs time to germinate and get established with strong healthy roots before it's ready for Fido to visit and play. A good rule of thumb is to let grass grow and mow it at least a few times before you allow dog or people traffic.

Prevention?

To help prevent dog spots around your lawn, the best plan of attack is to train your pooch to relieve himself in a specific area of your yard. Mulch an area of your landscape with natural wood mulch so it blends in well and Fido can urinate somewhere other than on your grass. Dogs usually respond well to the extra attention and praise that using their special spot brings. Some pet stores and even vet clinics offer dietary supplements that promise to change the nitrogen content or pH of dog urine. However, there is no scientific evidence that these products work.

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